An end-user license agreement (EULA, /-ju-l/) is a legal contract between a software developer or provider and the user of the software, often acquired by the user through an intermediary such as a distributor. A Board defines in detail the rights and restrictions applicable to the use of the software. [1] If additional conditions, subscriptions, rights or licenses related to the sublicensing software under this license are agreed in writing by the licensee, these conditions are also included by reference and are part of the license. The term narrow wrap license commonly refers to any software licensing agreement that is included in software and is not accessible to the customer until after purchase. As a general rule, the license agreement is printed on paper contained in the boxed software. It can also be displayed on the screen during the user`s installation, in which case the license is sometimes called the Click-Wrap license. The client`s inability to verify the license agreement prior to the purchase of the software has led to the absence of legal difficulties in some cases. A licensing agreement is a legal contract between two parties, the licensee and the licensee. In a typical licensing agreement, the donor grants the purchaser the right to manufacture and sell products, apply a brand name or trademark, or use the licensee`s patented technology. In return, the taker generally submits to a number of conditions relating to the use of the licensee`s property and undertakes to publicize the payments in the form of royalties. Some end-user licensing agreements accompany shrunken software, which is sometimes presented to a user on paper or, in general, electronically during the installation process. The user has the choice to accept or refuse the agreement.

The installation of the software depends on the user clicking a button called “accept.” See below. Another common element of licensing agreements is the party that retains control over copyrights, patents or trademarks. Many contracts also contain a provision on territorial rights or distribution in different parts of the country or the world. In addition to the various clauses included in the licensee protection agreements, some licensees may add their own requirements. They may insist on the guarantee that the licensee owns, for example, the property`s property rights, or they may insert a clause prohibiting the licensee from directly competing with the property granted in certain markets. Also, in ProCD v. Zeidenberg, the license was declared enforceable because it was necessary for the customer to accept the terms of the agreement by clicking a “I agree” button to install the software. However, in Specht v. Netscape Communications Corp., the licensee was able to download and install the software without having to review the terms of the agreement and approve it positively, so that the license is considered unenforceable.